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What Is A Piggyback Mortgage and Is It Right For You?

by Galand Haas

Good Morning!

A loan program that was popular several years ago is making a comeback and many lenders are now offering options for a mortgage loan program called "the Piggyback mortgage".

The following will give you some insight into just what a Piggyback mortgage is and also it will give you some information to help you decide if a "Piggyback" loan is a good option for you, if you are searching for a home loan.

Definition of a Piggyback Mortgage

Also called a “purchase money second mortgage,” a piggyback loan is used by homebuyers with less than 20 percent down to avoid paying for private mortgage insurance (PMI).

Types of Packages

Typical packages might be called 80-10-10 (80 percent first mortgage, 10 percent second mortgage, and 10 percent down payment from the buyer), 80-15-5 (a 15 percent second mortgage, and a five percent down payment) or even an 80-20 (80 percent first mortgage, 20 percent second mortgage, and no down payment from the buyer).

Buyers considering this financing should compare the costs of a second mortgage (they do have higher interest rates than first mortgages) with the cost of a bigger first mortgage plus mortgage insurance. They should compare the after tax costs, because borrowers with higher incomes may not be able to deduct mortgage insurance, but they may still be able to write off mortgage interest.

Piggyback Loan Explained

Essentially, a piggyback loan helps homebuyers who don't have the traditional 20 percent down payment when applying for a mortgage.

A piggyback loan occurs when a borrower takes out two loans simultaneously: one for 80 percent of a home's value, and the other to make up for whatever cash is lacking to make up a 20 percent down payment. This is used as an alternative to private mortgage insurance. A piggyback loan is also known as a second trust loan.

The most common type of piggyback loan is an 80/10/10 where a first mortgage is taken out for 80 percent of the home’s value, a down payment of 10 percent is made and another 10 percent is financed in a second trust loan at a higher interest rate. In some cases, you may even qualify for a piggyback loan with as little as a 5 percent down payment (known as an 80/15/5).

Many lenders will finance loans with down payments of less than 20 percent, but you'll pay a price. Usually, the lender insists you buy private mortgage insurance (PMI) which guarantees that the outstanding balance of your loan will be paid off if you default. You will either pay a lump sum each year for PMI or add the cost to your monthly mortgage payments.

Piggyback loans eliminate the need for PMI. You combine this loan with your down payment to reach the 20 percent down needed for a conventional mortgage. This can significantly lower the interest rate of your mortgage.

If you get a piggyback loan, you will close on it the same time as you close on the mortgage. You will most likely have to pay closing costs, which will require additional upfront cash.

You will probably also have to make two loan payments each month — one for your mortgage and one for the piggyback loan. The interest rate on the piggyback loan will probably be higher. But, the monthly payments of both loans are often still less than they would be if you were paying PMI.

Another benefit of a piggyback loan is that the interest may be tax-deductible, potentially saving you even more money. Check with a tax adviser on how a piggyback loan would affect your tax situation.

Have an awesome week!

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Which Mortgage Is Best: Low or High Down Payment?

by Galand Haas

Good Morning!

I am often asked about home mortgages and what home loans are the best way to go.  There are many options out there today and some options are certainly better than others depending on your situation.  The following article is from "Realty Times" and it talks about the differences between loans with low down payments and those with higher downs.  

The minimum down payment on an FHA loan is 3.5 percent, which makes it a popular choice among those who don't have the funds for a large down payment (and also those who don't meet the higher credit score requirements for other types of loans). And that's not even the lowest you can go. Loans like this one require only three percent down, and if you're a veteran or are buying a home in a rural area, you may be able to buy a home for nothing down. But should you go that low just because you can, or are you better off making a larger down payment? We're breaking it down.

The case for 20 percent

There are several advantages to putting down 20 percent when buying a home, like:

  • Since the bank will generally consider you a lower risk because you have "more skin in the game," you may be able to get a lower interest rate than you would with other types of loans—as long as you have the credit score to support it.
  • You'll have built-in equity as soon as you move in.

    You can avoid paying private mortgage insurance (PMI).

  • It's that last part that drives a number of people to strive for that 20 percent down payment since PMI can add several hundred dollars to a new homeowner's monthly payment, and it can be hard to get rid of it. "If you can put 20% down and avoid PMI, that is ideal, said certified financial planner Sophia Bera on Business Insider.

 

The case for as little down as possible

The biggest roadblock to homeownership for many people is coming up with the down payment, so minimizing that expense sounds great, right? "The good news is a first-time buyer can purchase a home for a little as three percent down - and even no money down in some cases," said U.S. News.

But is that a smart move?

"The less you put down, the higher the mortgage insurance is," Casey Fleming, author of "The Loan Guide: How to Get the Best Possible Mortgage" and a mortgage professional in the San Francisco Bay Area, told them. "With five percent down, the mortgage insurance is quite high." 

Yep, there's that pesky PMI again, which, for many first-time buyers, pushes their monthly payment to a level they're not comfortable with. Another bummer about PMI: "If you need to pay PMI, the size loan you can get will be slightly smaller, to allow for the bigger payment," they said.

You may also have trouble qualifying for a loan even if you have a high enough credit score because you don't have enough cash reserves; if you are using all your savings for the down payment and the lender questions where the funds for your closing costs, taxes and insurance, and any needed repairs are coming from, you could have a problem.

But, on the flip side, a smaller down payment will up your rate of return, said The Mortgage Reports. "Consider a home which appreciates at the national average of near five percent. Today, your home is worth $400,000. In a year, it's worth $420,000.

Irrespective of your down payment, the home is worth twenty-thousand dollars more. That down payment affected your rate of return. With 20 percent down on the home - $80,000 - your rate of return is 25 percent. With three percent down on the home - $12,000 - your rate of return is 167 percent."

Even when you add in the PMI and a higher interest rate, the equation comes out in favor of the lower down payment. "With three percent down, and making adjustments for rate and PMI, the rate of return on a low-down-payment loan is still 106 percent - much higher than if you made a large down payment. The less you put down, then, the larger your potential return on investment."

The case for somewhere in between

Finding that balance between down payment and savings is a challenge for many homebuyers, and the sweet spot will be different for everyone depending on their unique circumstances and financial situation. Most financial experts will say that saving and scrounging to get together 20 percent at the risk of depleted savings and zero emergency funds is a shaky strategy, at best.

"If putting 20 percent down means that you use all of your savings, then don't do it! I would much rather see people put five percent down, wipe out all their other debt with cash, and still have three months of emergency savings versus putting 20 percent down on a house," said Bera.

Especially when you consider all the added costs you may be facing once you buy: "yard work, home repairs, renovation costs, property taxes, insurance, etc. It's important to consider all of the costs and not just compare the monthly mortgage payment to your current rent amount," she said.

Another thing to consider when evaluating how much you should put down is what would happen if you had an emergency. It's easy to lose sight of real-life issues that can arise when you are so driven to buy a home and focused on saving the money to get there.

"A financial event can leave you wishing you had access to the money without selling," said The Mortgage Reports. "Say you lose a job for three months. An extra $20,000 would be a nice safety cushion. And, if you lose your source of income, you can't take home equity out via a cash-out refinance or home equity line of credit (HELOC). Lenders won't approve a new loan to someone between jobs. In short, the more you need to get at the money, the less access you have to it."

If you have further questions on home loans, contact me.  I work with some of the best mortgage professonals in the Eugene and Springfield area and I can get you connected with one of them.

Have an awesome day!

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Credit Score: How Low Is Too Low To Buy A Home?

by Galand Haas

Good Monday Morning!

Frequently, I get questions from would-be homebuyers in regards to credit scores and home purchases. There are requirements for any home loan on specific credit scores needed to obtain a loan.  The following is a great article from "Realty Times" that explains the credit score process for home financing.

When it comes to your credit score, how low is too low? The number you really need to buy a house.

We all know that when it comes to buying a house, there are a few things we need, like a down payment and a good enough credit score to qualify for a loan. But what does a "good enough credit score" really mean? Does your credit history have to be impeccable? Can you have a couple of boo-boos? And, if you do have issues on your report, how much of a hit will you take? Your credit score is "a number, roughly between 300 and 850, that summarizes a consumer's creditworthiness," said Bankrate. "The higher the score, the more able and willing a consumer is to repay a loan, lenders believe. The best mortgage rates and terms go to borrowers with credit scores of 740 and higher."

But most of us can't measure up to that number. Thankfully, we don't have to. There's room for lower scores - even really low scores - depending on the type of loan you're applying for, with a number of other factors (your income and work history, the amount of your down payment, the state of the economy) thrown in. Knowing where the bottom is will help you figure out how to proceed.

FHA loans

The advantage to a Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loan for many buyers is the low down payment. You may need only 3.5% down to purchase a home with this type of loan, which is backed by the government. But, you'll need a minimum 580 credit score if you're only planning to put 3.5% down. Can't meet that benchmark? You'll need more cash up front.

"If your credit score is below 580, however, you aren't necessarily excluded from FHA loan eligibility," said the FHA. "Applicants with lower credit scores will have to put down a 10 percent down payment if they want to qualify for a loan."

For FHA loans, your credit score can be as low as 500. But, "Those with credit scores between 500 and 579 are limited to 90 percent LTV," which leaves a lot of people out of luck.

Non-government-backed loans

The issue with FHA loans for many buyers: That pesky private mortgage insurance (PMI), which can add several hundred dollars to the monthly payment and is "required any time you put less than 20% down on a conventional loan," said My Mortgage Insider.

If you have a larger down payment, you may be able to avoid paying PMI by going with another type of loan - but only if you have the credit score. "To qualify for a conventional mortgage, a borrower generally needs a minimum credit score of 680 and at least 5 percent down," said Bankrate. "Many lenders require at least 10 percent down."

There may be more wiggle room in that credit score if you can come up with more money for a higher down payment. But, if it's too low, you'll likely be pointed right back to FHA loans. On the other end, a higher score will get you the best possible interest rates.

Subprime mortgages

Have a credit score below 500? You're officially in the "bad credit" zone. But, you may still be a candidate for a loan, even if you can't qualify by FHA standards, by going with a subprime mortgage. The word "subprime" still sends shivers down the spines of many people because loans extended to what many industry professionals considered to be unqualified applicants were largely blamed for the last housing crash. Accordingly, many of these opportunities dried up in the aftermath.

Today, though, subprime mortgages are available. Keep in mind that minimum credit scores will depend on the individual loan and lender, and each borrower's unique set of financial circumstances. And, you'll pay for the privilege of being extended a loan with higher rates and/or fees.

"Subprime mortgage lenders mostly use collateral like equity earned when considering a ‘refinance' or a more significant down-payment when talking about a ‘purchase money' transaction," said First Time Home Financing.

Private Money Lenders

If all other avenues fail, you may still be able to get a loan with your bad credit from a private money lender. These are individuals with money to spend who are looking for investments. Because your low credit score makes you risky, you'll be charged more for your loan.

"Your personal credit is usually a smaller factor in these types of loans. However, you should know that the interest rate on these loans is much higher - in the range of 10-15%," said First Time Home Financing. "If you really have bad credit, this could be your only option for the time being."

Have An Awesome Week!

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Mortgage Loan Mistakes Than Can Cost You Real Money

by Galand Haas

Good Morning!

With mortgage loans remaining at historic low levels and the brisk housing market, I find many home buyers making huge mortgage loan mistakes.  Here is a recent article from "Realty Times", that just might help you if you are in the market for a mortgage loan.

For most buyers, the mortgage is the largest monthly expense they will have. Yet most borrowers will do little to no preparation, negotiation, or shopping to get the best deal. And they end up paying much more for their loans than they need to. You? You're smarter than that, or you wouldn't be reading this article. Here are five of the biggest mistakes that can cost you real money.

1. Believing advertised rates are what you'll pay

Unless you have perfect or near-perfect credit, most advertised rates are out of your league. To get boasting rights on a rate that good, you have to pay part of a point (one percent of the loan amount), or more to get the best rates.

Your lender will go over your credit with a fine-tooth comb to find anything to raise the rate. That includes qualifying you at the beginning of the transaction, and then running your credit again a day or two before you're supposed to close on the home and loan. If there's been any change in your debt-to-income ratio, goodbye low mortgage rate.

2. Not comparing lenders

Just like everyone knows two or three real estate agents or more, everyone knows a loan officer or a mortgage broker. A loan officer works for a bank or savings and loan and can only offer you loan packages that the bank has put together. A mortgage broker prequalifies you just like a loan officer, and shops your deal around to various lenders.

Whether you talk to a loan officer or a mortgage broker, you're going to have to share personal financial information in order to get a realistic rate. Reputable brokers will show you what certain banks and credit unions quoted and you can pick the loan you like best.

If you'd rather do your own shopping, consider talking to a local bank, a national bank, a credit union, and a savings and loan, but remember, unless you give them personal information and permission to run your credit, it's just talk.

3. Not paying attention to terms

Advertised rates even for those with perfect credit aren't what you will actually pay. The true cost of the loan is the APR or annual percentage rate, which includes fees from the lender.

Understanding loan terms is harder than shopping for a new mattress. There are so many ways lenders can inch up the fees. A loan origination fee is also called a processing fee. It pays the loan officer or mortgage broker, so this fee can vary widely. You may pay one lender more for an appraisal than another might charge you.

One lender may charge more for pulling your credit than another. It's all in your good faith estimate, which you don't get until you've applied for the loan.


All terms are negotiable, so don't be afraid to ask what a particular fee is for and can it be reduced or eliminated.

4. Waiting for a better rate

It's great to have bragging rights on a low rate, but you don't want to lose the home of your dreams over a quarter of a point in interest.

There's a big picture here you could be missing. No matter what your interest rate is, you're going to pay thousands of dollars in interest up front before you make any serious gain in equity. If you go all the way to the end of your loan's term, you'll pay so much interest that you could have bought the same home two or three times.

Instead of focusing on the percentage rate, work on how quickly you can build equity. Make one extra payment a year. Pay $25, $100, or $500 extra per month and you'll more than offset the rate you're paying.

Down the road, if rates drop through the floor, you can refinance, but even that's not an ideal solution. You'll pay loan origination fees, title search fees, appraisal fees and so on -- enough to equal the closing costs you paid the first time around.

And don't forget, you'll start the amortization schedule all over again -- with most of your payments going to interest instead of principal.

5. Choosing the wrong type of loan

Many families were hurt post-9/11 when lenders opened the spigots and gave a loan to almost anyone who could sign the paperwork. Suckers bought homes that were too expensive using balloon loans with low teaser rates.

The type of loan you choose should depend on current market conditions and how long you plan to stay in your home, not how much home you want to buy.

Current market conditions favor fixed rates, because rates are rising from all-time lows. Yes, they cost more than hybrid loans or adjustable rate loans, but the base amount is fixed and doesn't change. Only your taxes and hazard insurance will cost you more over the years.

If you get an adjustable rate mortgage, you are at the mercy of market conditions. While there's a cap on how high your interest rate can go, it's still a risk.

If you plan to stay in your home five years or more, get a fixed-rate mortgage. If you plan to sell your home sooner, you're taking a risk. It takes most borrowers five years just to earn back their original closing costs in equity.

Once you've narrowed your choice of lenders, ask them on the same day to give you a quote. If you wait even one day, rates may have changed, so you're no longer comparing apples to apples.

If you need a good lender, contact me.  I have a list of great local lenders that I can provide you with.

Have An Awesome Week!

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Good Monday Morning!

I am asked frequently these days about mortgage rates jumping due to the Feds recent increase in their rates.  The fact is that the Fed's increase had little effect on mortgage rates and in fact mortgage rates have continued to decline since the Fed increase.  If you want to purchase a home, now is the time.  Our current low mortgage rate situation is not here to stay, but you need to take advantage of it.  Here is an article from "Realtor.com" that explains our current situation with mortgage rates.  It is an interesting read.

The Federal Reserve recently raised interest rates, U.S. stocks are tumbling and new worries about the Chinese economy seem to emerge daily. So go ahead and buy that house you’ve been looking at.

Well, not necessarily. But consider: all the worries about China that have battered the U.S. stock market in early 2016 have done the opposite for bonds. More money pouring into Treasurys has driven mortgage rates to a two-month low. A 30-year mortgage slipped to 3.92% in mid-January.

The housing market had already been steadily gaining ground even before the latest drop in rates. Indeed, it’s been one of the strongest parts of the economy over the past year. Sales of new and previously owned homes are likely to finish 2015 at the highest level since before the Great Recession.

What’s more, the number of permits to build additional homes is on track to reach an eight-year high.

The final housing numbers for 2015 will start to trickle in this week.

Work on new construction, known as housing starts, is forecast to rise to a 1.19 million annual rate in December from 1.17 million in the prior month. Starts will top the 1 million mark for the second straight year.

Six years ago, builders were producing fewer than 600,000 new homes a year.

Sales of existing homes, meanwhile, are expected to hit a 5.15 million annual rate in December and finish the year about 25% higher compared to the post-recession low.

Most economists predict new construction and sales will increase again in 2016, aided by a much improved labor market. Barring, of course, China bringing the rest of the world to a crashing halt.

“The U.S. economy added more than 200,000 jobs per month on average in 2015, and wage growth is picking up,” noted Stuart Hoffman, chief economist of PNC Financial Services.

In the past three years, the U.S. has produced 8.2 million new jobs to give more people entering their prime earning years the ability to buy a home.

The big wild cards are mortgage rates and home prices, both of which could deter buyers.

The Fed raised a key short-term rate in December for the first time in nearly a decade, and the central bank is widely expected to push rates even higher in 2016. Yet so far that hasn’t translated into upward pressure on long-term Treasurys or home mortgages. Right now investors are more worried about whether a slowing Chinese economy will hurt the rest of the world.

The higher cost of buying a home could act as another repellent. Prices rose in 2015 to levels last seen shortly before the onset of the Great Recession in late 2007.

An expected increase in home construction could make it easier for buyers, though. Permits for new construction in November, for instance, were almost 20% higher compared to the same month in 2014. A greater supply of homes for sale would help hold the line on prices.

While home builders remain optimistic, the same can’t be said for American manufacturers. Sales and profits have softened over the past year because of a strong dollar, weak global economy and a slump among energy firms that are among the biggest buyers of manufactured goods.

A monthly Philadelphia Federal Reserve report on the state of manufacturing is likely to show an industry still under siege in January.

Have An Awesome Week!

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Changes to Your New Mortgage Loan

by Galand Haas

Good Morning!

Things have now changed with your new mortgage loan.  New documents are now going to be required on all transactions and these new documents and new rules will most likely increase the amount of time it takes to close on your loan.  Here is a recent article from Realty Times that talks about the new items that went into effect on October 3rd of this year.

The Know Before You Owe disclosure form issued by The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau will go into effect on October 3, 2015. The rule provides for easier-to-use mortgage disclosure forms that clearly lay out the terms of a mortgage for a homebuyer.

But some lenders and real estate agents say the new mortgage rules may delay closings. What will change is that three documents, the HUD-1 Settlement Statement, the Good Faith Estimate, and the Truth-in-Lending disclosure will be pared down to two new closing forms called a Loan Estimate and a Closing Disclosure.

The Loan Estimate form must be given to consumers no later than three days after they formally apply for a loan. That means providing financial information to the lender and signing a mortgage application.

When the consumer receives the Loan Estimate form, he or she will know what the loan amount and the interest rate will be, how much the monthly payment is, an estimate of taxes and insurance based on local rates, and how much down payment is required.

To prepare for settlement, homebuyers will have a three-day period to review the Closing Disclosure form. Because of the added review period, lenders are recommending that borrowers lock in their mortgage rates for longer periods than they normally would.

CNBC real estate reporter Diane Olick explains that the "new rules will require lenders, title companies, real estate professionals and insurance representatives to all come together sooner in the process to ensure the disclosures do get out in time."

For example, a 30-day rate lock is typical, but borrowers can extend the lock period up to 45 days or 60 days. However, there may be a question as to whether or not more time is really needed to close the loan.

According to Bankrate.com, Borrowers are often told there's no charge for a rate lock. That's true in the sense that the rate lock isn't associated with a fee. But a rate lock isn't free.

Josh: A longer rate lock typically involves a higher interest rate, which is more expensive for the borrower. The interest rate or "pricing" difference between a 15-day rate lock and 60-day rate lock might be as little as one-eighth or as much as half of a percentage point, or roughly $25 to $50 per month for the life of the loan.

Laura: Meanwhile, real estate agents are preparing for the worst. According to a new survey by the National Association of REALTORS® says that about 56 percent of REALTORS® say they plan to add more time to their contracts.

Have An Awesome Week!

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Monday Morning Real Estate Update 5/12/08

by Galand Haas

Good Monday Morning!

It looks like Summer may arrive this week.  90 degrees by Friday!!!

There is certainly a great deal of inflation taking place in the economy right now.  Gas is hitting $4 per gallon, postage went up to $.42 for a stamp, groceries and everything else are going through the roof.  One area that this is not the case is with home prices here in the Eugene and Springfield area.  Home prices are dropping and there are some extremely attractive opportunities available right now.  Mortgage loan rates are also attractive and are holding at under 6% for 30 year fixed financing.  It would appear that home prices may continue to decline even further over the coming months.  The unknown is whether mortgage rates will remain at the current low levels.

Have An Awesome Week!



AND HERE'S YOUR MONDAY MORNING COFFEE!!

Sincerely,
Galand

Monday Morning Real Estate Update 5/5/08

by Galand Haas

Happy Cinco De Mayo!

There have been a number of articles written as of late indicating that renting is a smarter choice than purchasing a home right now.  Although, renting may be necessary for some people, home purchase remains a smart choice for most.  Long term, home ownership is one of the best investments most of us can make.  There is not only appreciation over time, but there are also significant tax benefits.  My advice is don't let the negative press on home ownership frighten you away from one of the most sound investments you can make.  Right now with home prices being soft and mortgage loan interest rates low, home purchase is a safe bet.

Have An Awesome Week!



AND HERE'S YOUR MONDAY MORNING COFFEE!!

Sincerely,
Galand

Monday Morning Real Estate Update 4/21/08

by Galand Haas

Good Monday Morning!

Snow on the ground in the Eugene and Springfield area in mid-April?  Wow!!!!

The month of March Real Estate statistics are out and it is clear that the market here continues it's downward trend.  Average days on the market are currently at 90 days, this compares to 78 days for March of 2007.  The biggest change is the number of closed home sales.  Closed home sales were down by 29.1% and pending sales by 28.7% from March of last year.  There was 10 months of active inventory on the market for March of this year.  This compares to 3.8 months of inventory in March of 2006 and 5.6 months of inventory in March of last year. 

Mortgage interest rates remain extremely favorable with 30 year fixed loans at around the 5 3/4% mark.  What a great time to be a home buyer!

Have An Awesome Week!



AND HERE'S YOUR MONDAY MORNING COFFEE!!

Sincerely,
Galand

Monday Morning Real Estate Update 4/7/08

by Galand Haas

Good Monday Morning!

The weekend saw an return to Winter type weather.  April is always interesting in our area, so look for more Spring and Winter weather to come.

The mortgage loan situation  continues to become tougher.  Lenders programs have been significantly reduced and many loan s that were easy to get just a few months ago have gone by the way side.  Interest rates continue to be well under 6% for 30 year fixed financing, but obtaining these loans can be a chore in some cases.  Now more than ever it is important to go to a good reputable lender.  Trying to do the cut rate version now may spell disaster.

There is now well over a 10 month inventory of homes on the market in the Eugene and Springfield area.  This means that for buyers there is a great deal of inventory to choose from.  Prices are soft in many areas, so it still is the perfect time to buy a home.

Have An Awesome Week!



AND HERE'S YOUR MONDAY MORNING COFFEE!!

Sincerely,
Galand

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Galand Haas Team
Keller Williams Realty Eugene and Springfield
2644 Suzanne Way
Eugene OR 97408
Direct: (541) 349-2620
Fax: 541-687-6411

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