Real Estate Information Archive


Displaying blog entries 1-8 of 8

8 Quick Tips On Preparing Your Home For Sale

by Galand Haas

Good Monday Morning!

Even in the hot sellers market that we currently have here in the Eugene and Springfield area, it is important to prepare your home for sale if you are going to put it on the market. Paying attention to detail and having your home in great condition can mean a quicker sale and far more money.  Even in this market, I see homes sit out there and not sell.  You still have to price your home right, but condition is an extremely important factor for most homebuyers.  Here is an article from "Realty Time" that will give you some pointers on preparing your home for sale.

Unless you've never bought or sold a house before and have never looked at home listings or watched a single show about real estate (which is pretty hard these days), you have some semblance of an idea of how your home should look when you go to sell it. You probably also have a clue about how best to show off that home in photos (or, at least, you know the importance of showing off that home in photos), even if you personally lack the skill to take them yourself.

But what happens when you ignore the rules? Does a hot market render them irrelevant? Is it OK to list a home for top dollar when the condition is more fixer-upper? "You might think that buyers can see the potential of a house that just needs a little bit of work, but most are looking for a house that is move-in ready and doesn't need any major repairs," said Business Insider. "And even a home that only needs minor repairs may still look like a bad deal to some buyers, turning them off based on appearance alone."

The truth is that if you want good money for your home, you have to do a little work to get it "show ready." Buyers expect to be able to walk into a clean, decluttered home - at the very least. If it's not updated, it better at least look like it's move-in ready.

So how do you explain this listing, then? We'll leave the address and other identifying info out of it to protect the innocent. But a few things we can say: The home is brand-new to the market, and is no bargain, as you might think from looking at the photos; It's priced at least $10,000 over what it should be, just based on comparables, which, for a house in the low $200,000s, is considerable. The photos were obviously taken by the homeowner, who clearly didn't know how to best show off the property (although there were a couple snaps that were passable for an amateur) and who, it looks like, didn't even care enough to try to get it right by: Getting the camera in focus, cleaning out cluttered spaces, and even making sure there weren't random people in the frame of one shot.

At least it will serve as a great example of "what not to do" when selling your home.

1. Don't take your own photos

We'd be remiss if we skipped over one of the main problems here before getting into the details. Don't Take Your Own Listing Photos. Oh, were we screaming? Photos that were not professionally done stick out like, well, photos that weren't professionally done.

"You already know that a listing with pictures attracts a lot more attention than one without, but do you know how to take great pictures of a home? Whether you're an agent or a person trying to sell his own home, it's vital that you make a big first impression, and pictures are the best (and maybe only) opportunity that you will have to do just that," said Inman.

If you absolutely insist on taking your own photos, at least consult some basic rules. Most of which were broken in the listing in question. Note that the photo below was one of the better of the bunch.

2. Address your kitchen

Don't want to make any upgrades to your kitchen before you get the home on the market? That'll cost you (literally). Even painting out those cabinets, a cheap and easy fix, would make a huge difference. But, if you're not going to make changes to improve this key area, at least make the most basic effort to show it in its best light by removing as much clutter as you can. That means everything off your countertops. And your fridge. And the top of our fridge. There's no reason that stuff can't be put away for photos, and for showings. Basic staging rule #1. 

3. Emphasize the space and function, not the other way around

That printer on the kitchen counterop says: "We don't have room for a home office." Unplug. Put in closet. Problem solved. 

4. Always keep your selling points in mind

People like bedrooms - clean and tidy bedrooms that they can imagine their children sleeping and playing in. What, exactly, are we trying to show off here? The dead animal on the wall? The clutter on the floor? The glare from the windows? Perhaps the unique angle of the image that ignored all those basic listing photo rules? This shot shows none of the attributes of the room and only makes a potential buyer question the seller's taste level—and gives them closet space concerns. 

5. Focus!

Maybe check the photo to make sure nothing is blurry before posting it? Just a suggestion. Also, even if this picture was in focus, it still wouldn't be effective. You're not selling bedding, you're selling a home. This image tells a potential buyer nothing about the size or condition of the room. 

6. Show off your bathroom

Where do we even start here? From the weird angle that doesn't show the space, to the missing light bulb, to the clutter in the shower/hanging robe, this is just all wrong. 

7. Emphasize outdoor space

It goes without saying that showing off your outdoor space is important. A little effort to repaint the unkempt patio would have helped. At the very least, mow the yard, trim the bushes, and remove the ladder. An unkempt backyard will only make a potential buyer wonder what else needs attention, especially if they've seen some questionable spaces indoors. 

8. Keep people out of your photos

Stalker alert! The straggler near the fence draws attention away from the other features of the yard - which, in this case, might not be so bad, really. Still…If you only have one photo of the yard or if the best of the bunch has a person in the frame, there's still one thing you can do: Learn how to use the camera's crop feature.

Have An Awesome Week!


755 Horn Ln

Price: $295,000  Beds: 4   Baths: 2   Sq Ft: 1868

Tranquil & spacious property! Beautifully landscaped 0.41 acre lot provides seclusion & great entertaining spaces. Remodeled home offers updated kitchen & baths, large living rm w/ gas fp, formal dining, large windows+skylight. Private master ste w/...View Home for Sale>>


Consider These 4 Criteria When Looking For Your Next Home

by Galand Haas

Good Monday Morning!

The low inventory of homes for sale that we currently have in our local Real Estate market has made home buying much more difficult.  The current shortage of homes for sale has driven prices up and made our home purchase market very competitive, especially in the price ranges where most first time homebuyers are looking.  It is easy to get caught up in this competitive market and pay too much for a home or purchase a home that may not fit your needs.  In this market, the help of a knowledgeable homebuyer specialist Realtor is a must.  They can help keep you from making mistakes that will haunt you down the road. It is also important to educate yourself about the current market and to not be forced into a rush purchase.  The following article from "Realty Times" talks about how to deal with a home purchase during this market.

There's no perfect home, but some homes are more ideal for your household than others. When you look for your next home, carefully consider these four criteria - price, features, location and condition. The closer you get to meeting all four criteria, the better your chances are of making a good buy.


In any market, price has to come first. To determine what you can comfortably afford, talk to your real estate professional. He or she can recommend a lender who will prequalify you for a purchase loan. When you know how much you can spend, it will be easier to shop for homes within your price range. With luck, one will stand out.


The size of your household and your activities determine the features you want in your next home. The number of bedrooms, baths and living areas are a matter of comfort and convenience. You may want an extra bedroom for guests or a second master suite for parents.

If you work a lot at home, you'll want a private home office or a computer nook. You may want a playroom for the kids, a separate laundry area, and fenced yard and covered patio for entertaining. An eat-in kitchen may be more important to you than a formal dining room. You may want an outdoor kitchen or at least an entertainment area.

Think about your daily life from morning to bedtime, and how your next home can make these activities more pleasant. This should be your "must-have" list, and will help you look at homes more objectively.


Some areas will always be more expensive to live in than others. Neighborhoods that are well-kept tend to maintain higher home values. Homes that are close to jobs, schools and shopping centers tend to sell for more money than homes without as much infrastructure.

What is the best home you can find in the area where you want to live? If these homes are out of your range, you can compromise -- buy a smaller home or a home that needs lots of work in the best neighborhood you can afford.


Condition refers to the state of repair. Does the home have curb appeal? Is it updated and well-maintained, or does it need extensive and expensive remodeling? Carefully consider any deferred maintenance, such as a roof that may need to be replaced in only a few years. Consider the design and functionality -- is the kitchen too small and would you be able to afford to remodel it? Look closely at repairs, cleanliness and traffic flow.

The one advantage of buying a home that needs updates and repairs is that these homes cost less than updated homes in the same neighborhood.

Be prepared to compromise. Don't frustrate yourself or your family looking for perfection. Sometimes the home of your dreams doesn't have every feature on your checklist, or it may be a little further away than your favorite neighborhood, but you'll be happy if it has most of criteria you want at the price you can afford.

Have An Awesome Week!


32538 Hatfield St

Price: $485,000 Beds: 5 Baths: 3 Sq Ft: 2472

Beautiful new craftsman style home located in the heart of Coburg. Located within walking distance to restaurants, shops and city park. Master suite and guest suite on the main level. Great room concept with a bonus room upstairs. Front yard landscaping and RV parking. Completion date mid-July. Hurry so you can select your own colors! Updated exterior view/picture coming soon. Taxes not yet determined.

Beautiful new craftsman style home located in the heart of Coburg. Located within walking distance to restaurants, shops and city park. Master suite and guest suite on the main level. Great room concept with a bonus room upstairs. Front yard landscaping and RV parking. Completion date mid-July. Hurry so you can select your own colors! Updated exterior view/picture coming soon. Taxes not yet determined. - See more at:
Beautiful new craftsman style home located in the heart of Coburg. Located within walking distance to restaurants, shops and city park. Master suite and guest suite on the main level. Great room concept with a bonus room upstairs. Front yard landscaping and RV parking. Completion date mid-July. Hurry so you can select your own colors! Updated exterior view/picture coming soon. Taxes not yet determined. - See more at:


3 Steps To Save Money For Your Dream Home

by Galand Haas

Good Morning!

Today, with home prices rising faster than wages and a slight bump in mortgage interest rates, the home market for first-time homebuyers is tougher than it has been in a long time.  Saving enough money for a downpayment and also enough money to keep monthly payments in check can be a tough task.  The following article from "Realty Times" gives would be first-time homebuyers some good advice on how to prepare for a home purchase.

According to Harvard University's "State of the Nation's Housing" report, while more people than ever before want to own their own home, fewer feel financially ready to do so yet. Reasons range from high rents to student loan debt. Millennials, in particular, are waiting longer to get married, start families and purchase their first home. But this is not necessarily bad news for the housing market. In fact, it could mean that the millennial generation has something to teach us all about saving consistently towards a big life goal such as owning your own home!

In this article, learn three important steps to take when you start saving for your dream home.

Step 1: Pay down your debt to clean up your credit.

Your credit score is a tricky business when it comes to saving for your first home. You have no history of carrying a mortgage, so you can't make any real impact there. What you can do is to clean up your overall credit report so your general credit score is as healthy as possible before you apply for your mortgage loan.

According to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC), a surprising number of Americans think they have "above average" (60 percent) to "very good" (41 percent) credit, although a full 48 percent have not seen their credit score in the past three years or ever.

So clearly, this is where you need to start. The best way to differentiate yourself from your competition (other people who are trying to convince a direct lender to give them a mortgage loan) is to pay down your debt, clear up any disputes on your credit report and, in so doing, boost your credit score so you can qualify for the best mortgage at the lowest interest rates.

Step 2: Separate and automate your savings.

Saving money is never going to be the easiest goal you attempt. In fact, according to The Atlantic, one of the chief reasons that nearly half of all Americans have little or no emergency savings to fall back on is taking on too much mortgage debt.

So here is a clear area where you should proceed with caution. First, save. Then, buy a home. The best approach to make saving as painless as possible for you is to automate your savings. You can do this by setting up direct deposit on your paycheck and then regular auto-drafts into a savings account reserved just for dream home savings. This way, you never even touch those funds and feel tempted to spend them instead.

Step 3: Downsize to upsize

Finally, one effective change many adults today are making to save more towards their dream home is to downsize while they save. This can mean anything from moving to a smaller apartment to getting rid of your cable television subscription. Also, you must continually remind yourself why you have downsized in order for this step to work well.

But the key to making downsizing work to serve your greater goals is to make sure you deposit every cent of what you save into your dream home fund. Referring back to Step 2 here, the easiest way to do this is to calculate for yourself exactly what you are saving by paying less rent, giving up cable, etc., and then setting up a monthly auto-draft in that amount to deposit directly into your dream home savings account.

By following these three steps, you can make tangible financial progress in saving to buy your dream home. If you can save 20 percent towards a downpayment, you can avoid paying expensive Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) and you may even qualify for a lower interest rate. Scrimping and saving is never fun or easy, but it will be worth it when your realtor hands you that brand-new set of house keys!

Have An Awesome Week!


Hilltop Drive #1

Price: $225,000    Beds: 0    Baths: 0    Sq Ft: 0

Development property platted for 8 residential building lots. Easy access for roads and utilities. Lot sizes range from 6,700 sq. ft. to 14,000 sq. ft. Plat map and estimate on development costs available upon request....View this property >>


7 Tips Toward Homeownership

by Galand Haas

Good Morning!

If 2017 is the year that you are planning on making a home purchase, the environment is going to be good for doing this.  The following are some guidelines for a home purchase that were published in "Realty Times".  

Thinking about buying your first home? What an exciting time this is bound to be. And, also, what a (potentially) overwhelming, confusing, and stress-filled time. It can easily veer into scary territory if you're not prepared and not surrounding yourself with professionals who can help guide you in the right direction.

These seven tips can help you make that dream of homeownership come true in 2017.

1. Work with the right real estate agent

The guy next door or your brother's girlfriend's cousin who just got his real estate license may be hungry to get your business, but that doesn't mean he's your best bet. An experienced agent quite simply knows things that someone who is brand new probably doesn't. An experienced agent will also have important relationships in place that may be able to help buyers in every facet of the home purchase, including:

  • Finding houses that aren't even listed yet

  • Finding homes that may be slightly outside of a buyer's criteria but that are worthy of consideration

  • Leveraging industry relationships to get you great deals or better terms

  • Managing appraisals and inspections

  • Working through every step of the purchase process and handling any issues that pop up along the way

  • Negotiating a deal that works for both sides

2. Don't be afraid to talk to multiple lenders

Your Realtor will most likely have several lenders they have worked with and can refer you to. You may also want to speak to loved ones and get a referral or two from someone they've worked with successfully. Each lender may have a different recommendation and/or knowledge of a special loan that works for you, so it makes sense to look at a few different options.

3. Mind your credit

Many people have no idea what their credit score is, but if you're thinking about buying a home, knowledge is power. Different loans have different minimum credit score requirements, and it could be that your score doesn't measure up for the best loan rates, or maybe you need to do some work to qualify for even the most lenient loan.

A good mortgage lender can advise you on your best options to raise your score, from removing any errors on your credit report, to paying any delinquent accounts, to exploring credit repair options. The earlier you learn your score and delve into the details with a qualified lender, the more time you have to address any issues you find.

4. Save, save, save

For many people, getting the down payment together is the hardest part of buying a home. And the closing costs can be an unwelcome surprise for those who weren't expecting to have to come up with even more cash. When you first set out to buy a home, make sure you know how much you have to save. Your lender should be able to give you a pretty good ballpark based on a certain home price. Housing experts recommend adding 5% to that number just to be safe.

Even if you've never been a great saver in the past, there are strategies you can use that will help you build the nest egg you need for your down payment and closing costs, including these tips from nerdwallet:

  • Automatic transfers from your checking account to your savings can help to make the process mandatory - and maybe a little less painful.
  • Save raises and bonuses rather than spending them.
  • Set aside tax refunds.
  • Keep the change. At least a couple of banks have variations on this theme. For example, Bank of America allows debit card users to sign up for a service that rounds up purchases to the nearest dollar and puts the change into a linked savings account.
  • Visualize your goal. Slap big, beautiful photos of your dream house on the refrigerator, near your office workspace - and wrap a small one around the primary credit card in your wallet. You might charge less and save more."
  • As for where to put that money while you watch it grow, experts recommend that "If the plan is to become a homeowner in the next 12 months, the money should be kept completely liquid. That means you can easily access it at any time," said CNN Money. "The best way to do that is in a good old-fashioned savings account, Schulte said. Look for one with a higher yield. In today's low rate environment, that probably means an online-only account like Ally or Synchrony Bank, which currently pay around 1% annually."

5. Lock in your rate

Rates can be unpredictable. Locking in a rate when you get close to buying, which your lender will undoubtedly recommend, can protect you if rates rise. Many lenders also offer a one-time adjustment in case rates go down.

6. Stay at your job

Not happy at work and thinking about making a change? If you're looking to buy a home, you may have to delay that plan. Part of your qualification for a mortgage will be based on your job history. Making a big change just before you buy or during the escrow process will be problematic. Lenders advise buyers to stay the course until after the home closes escrow.

7. Don't open new credit cards or buy a new car

Your lender will spell out the do's and don'ts of how to protect your credit when trying to buy a house, but if you haven't yet talked to anyone and you think you're getting close to be purchase-ready, that Kohl's card you take out to save 20% on your $100 bill could cost you. Before you take out any new debt, check with a lender.

Have An Awesome Week!


2445 Elysium Ave

Price: $350,000    Beds: 4    Baths: 2    Half Baths: 1    Sq Ft: 2172

Remarkable remodel! Luxurious updates, lots of natural light, abundant storage, large corner lot. Large atrium entry with flagstone tile. Spacious family room with vaulted ceiling, beams, Coretec Plus vinyl wood floor, 2 sliders & gas fireplace. Ope...View Home for Sale >>


The Best Way to Save Money During the Home Buying Process

by Galand Haas

Good Morning!

Finding the perfect home to buy is only a part of the home purchase process.  Getting a mortgage loan is the second part and it can be complicated.  Not knowing the facts can cost you thousands up front and cost you far more down the stretch.  With mortgage loans, if it seems to good to be true, it probably is.  Do your research and don't fall for gimmicks or rates that seem to be much lower than the norm.  My suggestion is to find a qualified mortgage professional in your market area.  You can find them typically by asking your Real Estate agent, asking friends, etc.  Ask for references and talk to them.  This is serious business and you want to make sure that you get the best mortgage package available.  

Most of your "money" challenge rests, not with the purchase price, but with the cost of borrowing money to buy. Saving a few thousand on the purchase price, but jumping into a mortgage without any research may mean that apparent purchase savings disappear into massive accrued interest costs.

The cost of borrowing someone else's money to buy a house or condominium can add interest and other charges that result in you paying two or three times the original purchase price after a couple of decades of ownership.

Invest "brain time" learning about how to finance the purchase and you'll get pay-back in how much less you spend on borrowing the money.

For instance, if you want to buy real estate, have you taken time to…

  • Understand how to present the best possible credit rating to qualify for the best rate and terms?
  • Learn which mortgage terms, including amortization period, prepayment options, frequency of interest compounding, and many more, can cost you money and how to protect yourself before you sign on the dotted line?
  • Discover how and why you should repay your mortgage loan as quickly as possible and save on years of interest payments?

Once again, talk of rising interest rates has us mesmerized. Whether you are selling to buy, purchasing a new build, or entering the real estate market for the first time, mortgage rates are a topic you've been following. Unfortunately, tracking rates alone won't teach you enough about how to save and how to protect all your interests when buying a home. While borrowing rates are important, they are one of many factors to consider when arranging a loan.

The internet offers many good sources of refinancing information mixed in with sources of too much bad advice, dated content, and devious promotion. Stick to solid, reputable sources, including government agencies and consumer associations, and remain skeptical of all you hear and read. Ask a lot of questions and take notes. The "exam" is your financial wellbeing.

Our tendency to click around popular sites, which may have sometimes undisclosed agendas, can make learning about mortgages harder, not easier. Jumping from site to site, blog to blog, author to author can be confusing. Learn the basics, including terminology, before you look for slick tricks. Master the language of mortgages, so you can comfortably discuss your options with mortgage and real estate salespeople.

One great educational opportunity is to learn from the mistakes and mishaps of others. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), established in 2010, describes itself as "a 21st century agency that helps consumer finance markets work by making rules more effective, by consistently and fairly enforcing those rules, and by empowering consumers to take more control over their economic lives."

Make a Complaint: If you've experienced difficulties with a financial product, they want to hear from you.

They'll forward your issue to the company involved and provide you with status updates.

Read about Complaints: Complaint Database.

CFPB also provides educational support to head-off problems and explain new disclosures: Know Before You Owe.

If you are looking for a mortgage professional in the Eugene/Springfield market area, contact me.  I have a list of the best mortgage professionals in our area.  I can save you both time and money.

Have An Awesome Week!


4215 Heins Ct

Price: $239,900    Beds: 3    Baths: 2    Sq Ft: 1489

Beautiful Brand New Home! Another great home from builder Gary Konold. Located in cul-de-sac w/ shopping only a 2 minute drive away! One level home offers  laminate wood flrs, granite counters...
View this property >>


8 Major Steps You Will Take When Buying a Home

by Galand Haas

Good Morning!

With mortgage interest rates continuing to hover at historic low levels, the number of people buying homes continues to increase. If you fall into this category, here are just a few tips from "Realty Times" about purchasing a home.

There are eight major steps you will take when you buy a home and each one is as important in its own way as the last.

Make your wish list -- Decide where you want to live and how many bedrooms and baths you'll need. Consider lifestyle -- condominiums offer shared amenities, with little responsibility. Single-family homes offer more space and privacy, but they also require more exterior and yard maintenance. Consider buying a fixer-upper for a reduced cost so you can remodel it to suit your needs.

Get preapproved -- You can prequalify yourself on the internet, but it takes a lender looking at your personal financial information to get prequalified. Your income, credit scores, revolving debts, obligations such as child support as well as the type of loan you choose will influence how much home you can buy. Other factors such as the down payment, interest rate and terms (30-year fixed or an adjustable rate) will determine what you can afford in monthly payments.

Hire a real estate professional -- Armed with a sensible price range, you're ready to hire a real estate expert to help you find the right home. Your real estate professional should be expert in the area where you want to live and familiar with the type of home you want to buy. Your agent should have house-by-house experience in the neighborhood you want so she or he can advise you.

Select your home -- No home is perfect, so don't let minor flaws influence you. Think long-term. Which available home best suits the needs of your household now and in the years ahead? Consider the amount of space, the floorplan, privacy, entertaining options and potential upkeep. Don't buy more than you need or can comfortably afford.

Make an offer -- Your offer should reflect current market conditions. If a home has been on the market a long time, you can ask the seller for a price reduction, but if it's new on the market, the seller is unlikely to comply. Sellers are more likely to respond to how much you love the home, than all the reasons why you don't think it's worth the asking price. Ask your real estate professional for advice on how to negotiate.

Get an inspection -- A home inspection is a professional third-party opinion of the home's condition. The inspector will point out the age of systems, and large and small repairs that are needed, so you'll know what you're facing as the next owner. Don't sweat small cosmetic flaws. Concentrate instead of high-cost items to replace such as air conditioners and roofing.

Get an appraisal - The bank appraisal determines market value to the lender. The appraiser will use comparables of similar homes that have recently sold. If the home doesn't appraise for the purchase price, the bank will refuse to make the loan unless you renegotiate with the seller. If it appraises for the asking price, the lender will move toward closing.

Go to closing -- Once final negotiations are complete, the parties to the transaction meet at the escrow office. This could be a title company, real estate attorney, or other closing agent customary in your area. All paperwork is signed by both parties. The lender pays the seller, minus any liens against the home such as the seller's mortgage. Once all the disbursements have been made, you get the keys to your new home, according to your agreement.

Have An Awesome Week!


2511 Garfield St

Price: $435,000    Beds: 3    Baths: 2    ½ Baths: 1    Sq Ft: 3908

Spacious custom home w/ tree views! Beautiful 3 levels offer amazing treetop views from lg private master ste which occupies entire upper level. Grand KIT w/ very lg cook island, eat-bar, cherry cabs, corian counters & Wilsonart lam flrs that lead t...
View this property >>


The Best Time to Buy a Home is Now

by Galand Haas

Good Afternoon!

There may never be a more opportune time to purchase a home than right now for a variety of reasons.  The following is an article from "Realty Times" that explains why!

"If you don't buy a home right now, you are STUPID!"

That's what Bloomberg said back in 2009. Actually, they said, "If You Don't Buy a House Now, You're Stupid or Broke."

They continued, "Well, you may not be stupid or broke. Maybe you already have a house and you don't want to move. Or maybe you're a Trappist monk and have forsworn all earthly possessions. Or whatever. But if you want to buy a house, now is the time, and if you don't act soon, you will regret it. Here's why: historically low interest rates."

They were talking about rates hovering around five percent. Today, rates are under four percent for a 30-year fixed-rate loan.

Reason No. 1 to buy now: Rates are low

"Low mortgage rates continue to keep ownership less expensive than renting," said Investopedia. "Even a small change in interest rates has a significant effect on what you'll pay each month and over the life of a 30-year mortgage. Take a $172,000 30-year mortgage, for example ($172,000 is 80% of the median sales price for existing homes of $215,000 after a 20% down payment). With an interest rate of 4%, you would pay $821.15 each month. At an interest rate of 5%, the monthly payment would be $923.33, and at 6%, the payment rises to $1031.23."

Reason No. 2: Rents are high

In many markets, rents are rising to unsustainable levels, reports the National Association of Realtors (NAR). "In the past five years, a typical rent rose 15% while the income of renters grew by only 11%."

The cities with the highest rent increase since 2009 include New York, San Jose, San Francisco, Denver, and Seattle. For the rest of the list, click here, and to see how much more renting can cost you over a lifetime, check out Riskology.

Reason No. 3: Qualifications are easier

During the real estate downturn of the mid-2000s, banks and lenders tightened the reins, and often only the most qualified applicants could get approved. Post-recession, qualifications have loosened. Buyers who can't show solid income and a minimum credit score probably won't be offered a risky interest-only ARM today, however, those with less-than-perfect credit and minimal funds still have options. The Federal Housing Association (FHA) minimums are a 620 credit score and a 3.5 percent down payment.


Reason No. 4: Private mortgage insurance fees are down

Buyers who put less than 20 percent down on their home generally incur a monthly fee in the name of private mortgage insurance (PMI). In January 2015, the government announced lower PMI rates on Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans, which equates to a savings of about $900 a year. Seventy-five dollars a month may not seem like much, but every little bit helps when you're committing to an investment as large as a home.

Reason No. 5: It's still one of the best investments out there

In fact, some would say it's the very best investment out there.

"Buying a home is the best investment any individual can make. Affordability is still at an all-time high," said CNBC.

Not only as a comparison between buying and renting, but as a measurable asset, homeownership stands up—as long as buyers make a smart decision.

"The largest measurable financial benefit to homeownership is price appreciation," said Investopedia. "Price appreciation helps build home equity, which is the difference between the market price of the house and the remaining mortgage payments."

Reason No. 6: It feels good

You know that pride of ownership thing? It's true. Really. Nothing compares to the feeling of walking into a home that's yours for the first time. Or painting the walls a color other than white. Updating the kitchen. Making it your own. Not worrying about your rent being raised. And, of course, watching your equity grow over time.

Have An Awesome Week!



3985 Monroe St

Price: $450,000     Beds: 4     Baths: 3    ½ Baths: 1     Sq Ft: 3142

Picturesque property in the hills! This 0.45 acre property backs up to a creek offering expansive views of the trees and sounds of nature. Entertain easily on 2 decks in the fenced backyard and in large bonus room on lower level. This home has an op...
View this property >>


Monday Morning Real Estate Update 12/4/06

by Galand Haas


Good Monday Morning!

It was a little bit cool over the weekend, but beautiful for this time of year.  It is a great time to drive around town and explore all of the Christmas lighting. There are some gorgeous neighborhoods.

It is also a great time of year to purchase a home if you are an interested home buyer.  Currently, there are a large number of great homes for sale that are priced extremely well.  The possibilities for home buyers is the best that it has been in years.  There are also some very competitive mortgage rates out there at this time.  Contact me if you would like information on a variety of great mortgage programs.

Have An Awesome Week!




Displaying blog entries 1-8 of 8




Contact Information

Photo of Galand Haas Team  Real Estate
Galand Haas Team
Keller Williams Realty Eugene and Springfield
2644 Suzanne Way
Eugene OR 97408
Direct: (541) 349-2620
Fax: 541-687-6411

Share This Page

Find Your Next Home

Homes for sale in the Eugene area are only a click away!